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Diagnostic role of multislice spiral computed tomography combined with clinical manifestations and laboratory tests in acute appendicitis subtypes
  1. Guang-Ming Li,
  2. Hui Zhou,
  3. Ming-Yu Liang,
  4. Shao-Ying Wu,
  5. Fang-Xu Jiang,
  6. Zhong-Ling Wang
  1. Department of Imaging, The Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Qingyuan, China
  1. Correspondence to Dr Guang-Ming Li, Department of Imaging, The Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Qingyuan 511518, China; ligm645648{at}163.com

Abstract

The study aimed to investigate the diagnostic role of multislice spiral CT (MSCT) combined with clinical manifestations and laboratory tests in acute appendicitis subtypes. Patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis were included for retrospective analysis and their clinical manifestations and MSCT signs were analyzed. The clinical manifestations of different subtypes of acute appendicitis, including simple appendicitis, suppurative appendicitis and gangrenous appendicitis, were compared. The clinical manifestations were anorexia in 51.1% of patients, nausea and vomiting in 62.0%, shifting right lower abdominal pain in 51.1%, elevated body temperature in 31.2%, right lower quadrant abdominal tenderness in 91.4%, rebound tenderness in 91.4%, increased white cell count in 89.1%, high neutrophil count in 88.2%, increased appendiceal diameter enlargement in 100%, surrounding exudate in 95.0%, fecal stones in 51.6%, appendiceal wall thickening in 94.6%, lymph node in 82.8% and intestinal stasis in 18.6%. There were statistically significant differences in body temperature and neutrophil percentage among the subtypes of appendicitis and they were lowest in simple appendicitis and highest in gangrenous appendicitis. There were statistically significant differences in appendix diameter and the surrounding exudate among the subtypes of appendicitis and they were lowest in simple appendicitis and highest in gangrenous appendicitis. Clinical manifestations and MSCT signs, especially body temperature, percentage of neutrophils and the surrounding exudate, might have significant diagnostic value in acute appendicitis.

  • Appendicitis
  • Tomography
  • spiral computed
  • Pathology
  • clinical

Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request.

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Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors G-ML: substantial contribution to the conception and design of the work. G-ML, HZ, M-YL, S-YW, F-XJ, Z-LW: acquisition, analysis and interpretation of data for the work. G-ML: drafting the work. G-ML, F-XJ, Z-LW: revising the work critically for important intellectual content. G-ML, HZ, M-YL, S-YW, F-XJ, Z-LW: final approval of the version to be published. G-ML, HZ, M-YL, S-YW, F-XJ, Z-LW: agreement to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.