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Organochlorine pesticides, oxidative stress biomarkers, and leukemia: a case-control study
  1. Arash Rafeeinia1,2,
  2. Gholamreza Asadikaram2,3,
  3. Mehrnaz Karimi-Darabi4,
  4. Moslem Abolhassani2,
  5. Mojtaba Abbasi-Jorjandi2,5,
  6. Vahid Moazed6
  1. 1Neuroscience Research Center, Institute of Neuropharmacology, School of Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran
  2. 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran
  3. 3Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Institute of Basic and Clinical Physiology Sciences, Kerman, Iran
  4. 4Department of Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Medical School, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Science, Ahvaz, Iran
  5. 5Physiology Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran
  6. 6Hematology and Oncology, School of Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran
  1. Correspondence to Professor Gholamreza Asadikaram, Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Institute of Basic and Clinical Physiology Sciences, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran. gh_asadi@kmu.ac.ir; asadi_ka{at}yahoo.com

Abstract

Exposure to pesticides has been linked to an elevated risk of leukemia. The present research aimed to evaluate the relationship between organochlorine (OC) pesticides and biomarkers of oxidative stress in patients with leukemia. This work was conducted on 109 patients with leukemia and 109 healthy controls. The serum concentrations of seven derivatives of OCs including alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), beta-HCH, gamma-HCH, 2,4-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), 4,4-DDT, 2,4-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), and 4,4-DDE along with acetylcholinesterase (AChE), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), paraoxonase-1 (PON1), and catalase (CAT) activities as well as total antioxidant capacity (TAC), nitric oxide (NO), protein carbonyl (PC), and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured in all the subjects. Levels of OCs were remarkably higher in patients with leukemia compared with the controls (p<0.05). In addition, levels of SOD, AChE, GPx, PON1, and TAC were remarkably lower in patients with leukemia compared with controls (p<0.05). In contrast, MDA, NO, and PC concentrations were higher in patients with leukemia than in the controls (p<0.05). Moreover, the serum level of 4,4-DDE was negatively associated with GPx activity (p=0.038). Our findings suggest that OCs may play a role in the development of leukemia by disrupting the oxidant/antioxidant balance.

  • environment
  • leukemia, myeloid, acute
  • oxidants

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Data availability statement

No data are available.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors GA: conceptualization, methodology, supervision, guarantor. AR and MKD: sample collection, performing experiments, and writing the manuscript. MAJ and MA: software and statistical analysis. VM: scientific and technical support. All authors revised and approved the final manuscript.

  • Funding This work was supported by a grant from Kerman University of Medical Sciences (grant number: 96000953) and is a part of a PhD thesis.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.