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Clinical relevance of the relationship between Trabecular Bone Score and metabolic syndrome
  1. Chi-Wei Shih1,
  2. Wen-Hui Fang2,
  3. Wei-Liang Chen2
  1. 1Department of Internal Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China
  2. 2Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China
  1. Correspondence to Dr Wei-Liang Chen, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; weiliang0508{at}gmail.com

Abstract

The Trabecular Bone Score (TBS) is an indirect measurement of bone quality, and studies have shown that TBS is an independent predictor of fracture risk. This cross-sectional investigation aimed to explore the relationship between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and TBS using data from the 2005–2006 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The association between individual MetS components and TBS was examined. There was a significant linear decrease in TBS with an increase in the number of MetS components. The β coefficients of TBS among participants with 3 and ≥4 MetS components were −0.015 and −0.041 (p=0.006 and p<0.001, respectively). Among participants with MetS, high systolic blood pressure, abdominal obesity, and high serum levels of triglycerides and glucose were significantly associated with lower TBS in fully adjusted models (p<0.05). Furthermore, there was a significant linear decrease in TBS with an increase in the number of MetS components in both sexes. TBS significantly decreased with an increasing number of MetS components in a US population. The components of MetS, including systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, and serum levels of triglyceride and glucose, exhibited a negative association with TBS.

  • bone and bones
  • fractures
  • bone
  • hypertension
  • triglycerides
  • diabetes mellitus

Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request. Data were derived from NHANES 2005–2006, which were deidentified participant data. Data are available upon reasonable request (email: weiliang0508@gmail.com).

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Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request. Data were derived from NHANES 2005–2006, which were deidentified participant data. Data are available upon reasonable request (email: weiliang0508@gmail.com).

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Footnotes

  • Contributors W-LC accepted full responsibility for the work and the conduct of the study, had access to the data, critically reviewed, and controlled the decision to publish. C-WS contributed to the design of the study, was responsible for the management and retrieval of data, contributed to initial data analysis and interpretation, and drafted the initial manuscript. C-WS, W-HF, and W-LC decided on data collection methods and were also responsible for data analysis decisions. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.

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