Article Text

Download PDFPDF
Opium may affect coronary artery disease by inducing inflammation but not through the expression of CD9, CD36, and CD68
  1. Mohammad Amin Momeni-Moghaddam1,2,
  2. Gholamreza Asadikaram2,3,
  3. Mohammad Masoumi4,
  4. Erfan Sadeghi5,
  5. Hamed Akbari6,
  6. Moslem Abolhassani7,
  7. Alireza Farsinejad8,
  8. Morteza Khaleghi8,
  9. Mohammad Hadi Nematollahi9,
  10. Shahriar Dabiri8,
  11. Mohammad Kazemi Arababadi10,11
  1. 1Nutrition and Biochemistry, Gonabad University of Medical Sciences, Gonabad, Iran (the Islamic Republic of)
  2. 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Afzalipur Faculty of Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran (the Islamic Republic of)
  3. 3Neuroscience Research Center, Institute of Neuropharmacology, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran (the Islamic Republic of)
  4. 4Cardiovascular Research Center, Institute of Basic and Clinical ‎Physiology Sciences, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran
  5. 5Fasa University of Medical Sciences, Fasa, Iran (the Islamic Republic of)
  6. 6Physiology Research Center, Institute of Neuropharmacology, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran
  7. 7Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Institute of Basic and Clinical Physiology Sciences,Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran
  8. 8Pathology and Stem Cell Research Center, Afzalipour Faculty of Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran
  9. 9Herbal and Traditional Medicines Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran
  10. 10Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Rafsanjan, Iran (the Islamic Republic of)
  11. 11Department of Laboratory Sciences, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Rafsanjan, Iran (the Islamic Republic of)
  1. Correspondence to Gholamreza Asadikaram, Neuroscience Research Center, Institute of Neuropharmacology and Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman 7616914115, Iran (the Islamic Republic of); Gh_asadi{at}kmu.ac.ir

Abstract

The molecular mechanisms of opium with regard to coronary artery disease (CAD) have not yet been determined. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of opium on the expression of scavenger receptors including CD36, CD68, and CD9 tetraspanin in monocytes and the plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interferon gamma (IFN-γ), malondialdehyde (MDA), and nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) in patients with CAD with and without opium addiction. This case–control study was conducted in three groups: (1) opium-addicted patients with CAD (CAD+OA, n=30); (2) patients with CAD with no opium addiction (CAD, n=30); and (3) individuals without CAD and opium addiction as the control group (Ctrl, n=17). Protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of CD9, CD36, and CD68 were evaluated by flow cytometry and reverse transcription-quantitative PCR methods, respectively. Consumption of atorvastatin, aspirin, and glyceryl trinitrate was found to be higher in the CAD groups compared with the control group. The plasma level of TNF-α was significantly higher in the CAD+OA group than in the CAD and Ctrl groups (p=0.001 and p=0.005, respectively). MDA levels significantly increased in the CAD and CAD+OA groups in comparison with the Ctrl group (p=0.010 and p=0.002, respectively). No significant differences were found in CD9, CD36, CD68, IFN-γ, and NOx between the three groups. The findings demonstrated that opium did not have a significant effect on the expression of CD36, CD68, and CD9 at the gene and protein levels, but it might be involved in the development of CAD by inducing inflammation through other mechanisms.

  • coronary artery disease
  • inflammation

Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request.

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request.

View Full Text

Footnotes

  • Contributors MA-MM, GA, and MK set up the study design and interpretation of the data. MA-MM, GA, ES, and HA performed statistical analyses, interpretation of the data, and original draft preparation. GA, HA, and MA-MM revised manuscript critically and provide of continuous guidance throughout the study. MA-MM, MA, MHN, AF, MK, and SD collection of data and performing the experiments. All authors read and approved the final manuscript. GA is responsible for the overall content as the guarantor.

  • Funding This work was supported by a grant from the Kerman University of Medical Sciences (IR/KMU/95/212).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.