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Coexisting psoriasis is associated with an increased risk of hospitalization for patients with inflammatory bowel disease: an analysis of the National Inpatient Sample database
  1. Ehizogie Edigin1,
  2. Jennifer Asotibe1,
  3. Precious Obehi Eseaton2,
  4. Olukayode Ahmed Busari3,
  5. Ikechukwu Achebe1,
  6. Asim Kichloo4,
  7. Shakeel Jamal5,
  8. Axi Patel1
  1. 1Department of Internal Medicine, John H. Stroger, Jr. Hospital of Cook County, Chicago, Illinois, USA
  2. 2College of Medicine, University of Benin, Benin City, Edo, Nigeria
  3. 3Department of Internal Medicine, Coney Island Hospital, Brooklyn, New York, USA
  4. 4Internal Medicine, CMU Medical Education Partners, Saginaw, Michigan, USA
  5. 5Internal Medicine, Central Michigan University, Saginaw, Michigan, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Asim Kichloo, CMU Medical Education Partners, Saginaw, MI 48602-5303, USA; kichlooasim{at}gmail.com

Abstract

This study compares the odds of being admitted for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in patients with psoriasis compared with those without psoriasis alone. We also compared hospital outcomes of patients admitted primarily for IBD with and without a secondary diagnosis of psoriasis. Data were abstracted from the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) 2016 and 2017 database to search for hospitalizations of interest using International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision codes. Multivariate logistic regression model was used to calculate the adjusted OR (AOR) of IBD being the principal diagnosis for hospitalizations with and without a secondary diagnosis of psoriasis. Multivariate logistic and linear regression analyses were used accordingly to compare outcomes of hospitalizations for IBD with and without secondary diagnosis of psoriasis. There were over 71 million discharges included in the combined 2016 and 2017 NIS database. Hospitalizations with a secondary diagnosis of psoriasis have an AOR of 2.66 (95% CI 2.40 to 2.96, p<0.0001) of IBD being the principal reason for hospitalization compared with hospitalizations without psoriasis as a secondary diagnosis. IBD hospitalizations with coexisting psoriasis have similar lengths of stay, hospital charges, need for blood transfusion, and similar likelihood of having a secondary discharge diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis, gastrointestinal bleed, sepsis, and acute kidney injury compared with those without coexisting psoriasis. Patients with coexisting psoriasis have almost three times the odds of being admitted for IBD compared with patients without psoriasis. Hospitalizations for IBD with coexisting psoriasis have similar hospital outcomes compared with those without coexisting psoriasis.

  • psoriasis
  • inflammatory bowel diseases

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Footnotes

  • Contributors EE and JA are credited with substantial contribution to the design of the work, acquisition and interpretation of the data, drafting the manuscript, revision of important intellectual content, final approval of the version published, and agreement of accountability for all aspects of the work. POE is credited with substantial contribution to interpretation of data, literature review of all sections discussed, drafting of the manuscript, final approval of the version published, and agreement of accountability for all aspects of the work. OAB and EE are credited with substantial contribution to acquisition, analysis, and interpretation of the data, revision of critically important intellectual content, final approval of the version to be published, and agreement of accountability for all aspects of the work. IA, AK, and SJ are credited with interpretation of the data, literature review of all sections, revision of important intellectual content, final approval of the version published, and agreement of accountability of all aspects of the work. AP is credited with interpretation of data, literature review, specifically for the discussion section, revision of the work for critically important intellectual content, final approval of the version published, and agreement of accountability for all aspects of the work.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Ethics approval Since all patient data in National Inpatient Sample are available publicly and de-identified, institutional review board approval was not obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement Data are available in a public, open access repository. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) databases are limited data sets. HCUP databases conform to the definition of a limited data set. A limited data set is healthcare data in which 16 direct identifiers, specified in the privacy rule, have been removed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.

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