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Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy for obesity-associated hypertension
  1. Erik Matthew Johnsen1,
  2. Gursukhmandeep Sidhu1,
  3. Jason Chen1,
  4. Rachel Moore2,
  5. Thierry Le Jemtel1,
  6. Rohan Samson1
  1. 1John W Deming Department of Medicine, Section of Cardiology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
  2. 2Surgical Specialists of Louisiana, Metairie, LA, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Rohan Samson, John W. Deming Department of Medicine, Section of Cardiology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; rsamson{at}tulane.edu

Abstract

Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy (SG) reduce blood pressure (BP) in obese patients with hypertension (HTN). We compared the effect of RYGB and SG on BP in obese patients with HTN at a large-volume, private bariatric surgery center using a propensity score analysis. The measurement and management of BP were exclusively left to the patient’s provider without any involvement of Tulane investigators. At month 1, RYGB and SG equally decreased: (1) mean body weight: 12.7 vs 13.2 kg (p=not significant (NS)) (2) systolic/diastolic BP: 8.5/5.3 vs 8.0/4.2 mm Hg (p=NS) and (3) average number of antihypertensive medications from 1.5 to 0.8 and from 1.6 to 0.6 per patient (p=NS). From month 1 to 12, BP remained unchanged after RYGB but tended to increase from month 6 to 12 after SG. Remission of HTN occurred in 52% and 44% of patients after RYGB and SG. In contrast to the full effect of RYGB and SG on BP at 1 month, body weight decreases steadily over 12 months after RYGB and SG. In conclusion, early after surgery, RYGB and SG equally reduce BP in obese patients with HTN. Thereafter, RYGB has a more sustained effect on BP than SG.

  • bariatric surgery
  • hypertension
  • obesity
  • body weight

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Footnotes

  • Contributors RS and TLJ planned the study. EMJ, JC and GS performed data collection. GS and EMJ performed the statistical analysis. RS and TLJ interpreted the data and drafted the manuscript. All authors contributed to editing the text.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Ethics approval The study was approved by the Tulane University Institutional Review Board review.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement Deidentified data are available upon request.

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