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In-hospital outcomes and prevalence of comorbidities in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction with and without infective endocarditis: insight from the National Inpatient Sample (2013–2014)
  1. Michael Albosta1,
  2. Shakeel M Jamal1,
  3. Asim Kichloo2,
  4. Farah Wani3,
  5. Beth Bailey1,
  6. Jagmeet Singh4,
  7. Ronak Soni5,
  8. Michael Aljadah6,
  9. Melissa Beshay3,
  10. Bashar Al Jayyousi7,
  11. Nicholas Haddad8,
  12. Khalil Kanjwal9
  1. 1Internal Medicine, Central Michigan University, Saginaw, Michigan, USA
  2. 2Department of Internal Medicine, CMU Medical Education Partners, Saginaw, Michigan, USA
  3. 3Department of Family Medicine, Samaritan Medical Center, Watertown, New York, USA
  4. 4Division of Nephrology, Guthrie Healthcare System, Sayre, Pennsylvania, USA
  5. 5Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio, USA
  6. 6Internal Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
  7. 7Department of Cardiology, Covenant HealthCare, Saginaw, Michigan, USA
  8. 8Department of Infectious Disease, Central Michigan University, Saginaw, Michigan, USA
  9. 9Department of Cardiology, McLaren Health Care, Flint, Michigan, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Asim Kichloo, Department of Internal Medicine, CMU Medical Education Partners, Saginaw, MI 48602-5303, USA; kichlooasim{at}gmail.com

Abstract

In patients with infective endocarditis (IE), ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is an uncommon phenomenon. Due to limited data, we intend to evaluate the clinical outcomes in hospitalized patients with STEMI with and without underlying IE. Mortality and morbidity are exponentially worse in STEMI with concomitant IE when compared with without IE. Patients with primary diagnosis of STEMI with and without IE were identified by querying the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project database of the National Inpatient Sample for the years 2013 and 2014 based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes. During 2013 and 2014, a total of 117,386 patients were admitted with the principle diagnosis of STEMI, out of whom 305 had comorbid IE. There was a significantly increased in-hospital mortality (27.5% vs 10.8%), length of stay (LOS) (14 days vs 5 days), acute kidney injury (AKI; 44.9% vs 18.7%), stroke (23.6% vs 3%), aortic valve replacement (9.5% vs 0.3%), mitral valve replacement (0.2%–5.2%), sepsis (50% vs 6%) and acute respiratory failure (36.7% vs 16.7%) in patients with STEMI with IE when compared with patients with STEMI and without comorbid IE. STEMI without IE had a higher number of angiographies (58.7% vs 25.9%) and percutaneous coronary interventions (50.7% vs 14.4%) during the hospital course when compared with STEMI with IE. In conclusions, hospitalized patients with STEMI with a concurrent diagnosis of IE are at higher risk of in-hospital mortality, increased LOS, AKI, stroke, valve replacements, and acute respiratory failure.

  • endocarditis
  • myocardial infarction
  • cardiovascular diseases

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Footnotes

  • Contributors MA, SMJ and AK are credited with substantial contribution to the design of the work, acquisition and interpretation of the data, drafting the manuscript, revision of important intellectual content, final approval of the version published, and agreement of accountability for all aspects of the work. FW is credited with substantial contribution to interpretation of data, literature review of all sections discussed, drafting of the manuscript, final approval of the version published, and agreement of accountability for all aspects of the work. BB is credited with substantial contribution to acquisition, analysis, and interpretation of the data, revision of critically important intellectual content, final approval of the version to be published, and agreement of accountability for all aspects of the work. JS, MA, MB, KK, NH and BAJ are credited with interpretation of the data, literature review of all sections, revision of important intellectual content, final approval of the version published, and agreement of accountability of all aspects of the work.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests KK is a consultant for Abbott St Jude Medical and Johnson and Johnson Biosense Webster.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Ethics approval Our institution does not require ethical approval for NIS database studies.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement HCUP databases conform to the definition of a limited data set. A limited data set is healthcare data in which 16 direct identifiers, specified in the Privacy Rule, have been removed. Please see this weblink: https://www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov/DUA/dua_508/DUA508version.jsp.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.

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