Article Text

PDF
Risk of psychiatric disorders in overactive bladder syndrome: a nationwide cohort study in Taiwan
  1. Nian-Sheng Tzeng1,2,
  2. Hsin-An Chang1,2,
  3. Chi-Hsiang Chung3,4,5,
  4. Yu-Chen Kao1,6,
  5. Hui-Wen Yeh1,7,8,9,
  6. Chin-Bin Yeh1,
  7. Wei-Shan Chiang1,
  8. San-Yuan Huang1,
  9. Ru-Band Lu1,10,
  10. Wu-Chien Chien3,4,11
  1. 1Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Republic of China
  2. 2Student Counseling Center, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Republic of China
  3. 3Department of Medical Research, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Republic of China
  4. 4School of Public Health, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Republic of China
  5. 5Taiwanese Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Association, Taipei, Republic of China
  6. 6Department of Psychiatry, Tri-Service General Hospital, Song-Shan Branch, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Republic of China
  7. 7Institute of Bioinformatics and System Biology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Republic of China
  8. 8Department of Nursing, School of Nursing, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Republic of China
  9. 9Department of Nursing, Kang-Ning University (Taipei Campus), Taipei, Republic of China
  10. 10Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine and Hospital, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Republic of China
  11. 11Institute of Life Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Republic of China
  1. Correspondence to Professor Wu-Chien Chien, Department of Medical Research, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 11490, Republic of China; chienwu{at}ndmctsgh.edu.tw

Abstract

Population-based cohort study investigating the risk of depression and other psychiatric disorders for patients with overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome is unavailable. This study investigated the subsequent risk of psychiatric disorders among patients with OAB in an Asian population. Using data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan, we established a cohort with 811 patients in an exposed group with OAB between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2000, and a non-exposed group, without OAB, of 2433 patients without OAB matched by age and year of diagnosis. The occurrence of psychiatric disorders and Cox regression model measured adjusted HRs (aHR) were monitored until the end of 2013. The overall incidence of psychiatric disorders was 41.7% higher in the exposed group with OAB than in the non-exposed group without OAB (14.2% vs 10.1%, p<0.001), with an aHR of 1.34 (95% CI 1.12 to 1.80, p<0.001) for the OAB cohort. OAB was associated with the increased risk of dementia, anxiety, depressive, sleep, and psychotic disorders, with aHRs as 1.53 (p=0.040), 1.61 (p<0.001), 2.10 (p<0.001), 1.43 (p<0.001), and 2.49 (p=0.002), respectively. The risk of psychiatric disorders, including depression and anxiety, is significantly higher in patients with OAB than in those without OAB. Evaluation of psychiatric status in patients with OAB is strongly recommended.

  • overactive bladder syndrome
  • psychiatric disorders
  • depression
  • anxiety
  • National Health Insurance Research Database
  • cohort study

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Contributors NST and WCC conceived the study, participated in its design and coordination, data interpretation, performed the statistical analysis and drafted the manuscript. WCC, CHC, HWY, HAC, RBL and YCK participated in the design of the study and data interpretation. CBY, SYH and WSC participated in the statistical analysis and data interpretation. NST wrote the paper. All authors have read and approved the final manuscript as submitted.

  • Funding This work was supported by Tri-Service General Hospital Research Foundation (grant numbers TSGH-C105-130, TSGH-C106-106, TSGH-C107-106, TSGH-C107-004).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Not required.

  • Ethics approval This study was conducted in accordance with the Code of Ethics of the World Medical Association (Declaration of Helsinki). The Institutional Review Board of the Tri-Service General Hospital approved this study and waived the need of individual consents since all the identification data were encrypted in the NHIRD (IRB number 1-104-05-145 and 1-106-05-055).

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.