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Postchallenge glucose increment was associated with hemoglobin glycation index in subjects with no history of diabetes
  1. Jun-Sing Wang1,2,3,4,
  2. I-Te Lee1,2,5,
  3. Wen-Jane Lee6,
  4. Shih-Yi Lin1,2,
  5. Wen-Lieng Lee2,7,
  6. Kae-Woei Liang2,5,7,
  7. Wayne Huey-Herng Sheu1,2,8
  1. 1 Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan
  2. 2 Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan
  3. 3 Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Science, College of Life Science, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan
  4. 4 Ph.D. Program in Translational Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan
  5. 5 Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
  6. 6 Department of Medical Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan
  7. 7 Cardiovascular Center, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan
  8. 8 Institute of Medical Technology, College of Life Science, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan
  1. Correspondence to Dr Jun-Sing Wang, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407204, Taiwan; jswang{at}vghtc.gov.tw

Abstract

We investigated the association between postchallenge glucose increment and hemoglobin glycation index (HGI), the difference between observed and predicted glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), in subjects with no history of diabetes. We enrolled 1381 subjects who attended our outpatient clinic for an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) to screen for diabetes. HGI was defined as observed HbA1c minus predicted HbA1c. The predicted HbA1c was calculated by entering fasting plasma glucose (FPG) level into an equation [HbA1c(%)=FPG(mg/dL)*0.029+2.9686] determined from an HbA1c versus FPG regression analysis using data from an independent cohort of 2734 subjects with no history of diabetes. The association between 2-hour glucose increment and HGI was analyzed using linear regression analyses with adjustment of relevant parameters. Overall, the proportions of subjects with normal glucose tolerance, pre-diabetes, and newly diagnosed diabetes were 42.3%, 41.3%, and 16.4%, respectively. Compared with subjects who had an HGI≤0, subjects with an HGI>0 had a lower FPG (95.0±13.3 vs 98.5±15.3 mg/dL, p<0.001) but a higher 2-hour plasma glucose (151.1±52.8 vs 144.6±51.4 mg/dL, p=0.027) and 2-hour glucose increment (56.1±46.1 vs 46.1±45.0 mg/dL, p<0.001). The 2-hour glucose increment after an OGTT was independently associated with HGI (β coefficient 0.003, 95% CI 0.002 to 0.003, p<0.001). Our findings suggested that postchallenge glucose increment was independently associated with HGI in subjects with no history of diabetes.

  • glycated hemoglobin A

Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request. Data cannot be made publicly available due to the ‘Personal Information Protection Act’.

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Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request. Data cannot be made publicly available due to the ‘Personal Information Protection Act’.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors JSW, WJL, and WHHS designed the research. JSW, ITL, SYL, WLL, and KWL conducted the research and collected the data. JSW and WLL analyzed the data. JSW, ITL, and WHHS wrote the first draft of the manuscript. WJL, SYL, WLL and KWL revised the manuscript critically for important intellectual content. All authors approved the final draft of the manuscript.

  • Funding This study was supported by Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (TCVGH-YM1070102 and TCVGH-1073505C, 2018; TCVGH-1083505C, 2019).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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