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Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis and prostate cancer: incidence and effects of radiotherapy
  1. Fiorella D’Auria1,
  2. Luciana Valvano1,
  3. Luciana Rago2,
  4. Teodora Statuto1,
  5. Giovanni Calice3,
  6. Giovanni D’Arena4,
  7. Vincenzo Fusco2,
  8. Pellegrino Musto4
  1. 1 Laboratory of Clinical Research and Advanced Diagnostics, IRCCS-CROB, Referral Cancer Center of Basilicata, Rionero in Vulture, Italy
  2. 2 Radiotherapy Service, IRCCS-CROB, Referral Cancer Center of Basilicata, Rionero in Vulture, Italy
  3. 3 Laboratory of Preclinical and Translational Research, IRCCS-CROB, Referral Cancer Center of Basilicata, Rionero in Vulture, Italy
  4. 4 Hematology and Stem cell Transplantation Unit, IRCCS-CROB, Referral Cancer Center of Basilicata, Rionero in Vulture, Italy
  1. Correspondence to Dr Fiorella D’Auria, Laboratory of Clinical Research and Advanced Diagnostics, IRCCS-CROB, Referral Cancer Center of Basilicata, Rionero in Vulture 85028, Italy; fiore.dauria{at}virgilio.it

Abstract

Monoclonal B-cells lymphocytosis (MBL) is a benign condition that may precede chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), not rarely present in peripheral blood of healthy elderly people, among which there is also a male prevalence. Though CLL has been associated with various types of solid tumors, including prostate cancer (PC), no data exist about the relationship between PC and MBL. We studied the frequency of CLL-like MBL clones in a group of 48 patients affected by PC and followed them during and after whole-pelvis radiotherapy (WPRT) treatment. We found four MBL clones (8.3%), two of which (4.2%) had a B-cell clonal count >1000 cells/µL (‘clinical MBL’). A single case (1.8%) of ‘low-count’ MBL occurred in a control group of 54 healthy males. Notably, normal B-lymphocytes were consistently affected by WPRT, while MBL clones were less radiosensitive. Our results suggest a possible association between ‘clinical’ MBL and PC and show a different impact of the radiation on monoclonal respect to normal B-cells, which could also imply a greater risk of clonal transformation.

  • lymphocytes
  • hematologic diseases

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Footnotes

  • FD and LV contributed equally.

  • Contributors FD designed the research study, analysed the data and wrote the paper. LR designed the research study and enrolled the patients. LV and TS performed flow cytometric analysis. GC and GD analyzed the data. VF designed the research study. PM designed the research study, analysed the data and wrote the paper.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Ethics approval Regional Review Board.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

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