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Development and validation of nomogram based on SIRI for predicting the clinical outcome in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinomas
  1. Yuan Chen1,
  2. Wenjie Jiang1,
  3. Dan Xi1,
  4. Jun Chen2,
  5. Guoping Xu1,
  6. Wenming Yin1,
  7. Junjun Chen1,
  8. Wendong Gu1
  1. 1 Department of Radiation Oncology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Changzhou, China
  2. 2 Department of Respiratory, The Seventh People’s Hospital of Changzhou, Changzhou, China
  1. Correspondence to Dr Wendong Gu, Department of Radiation Oncology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Changzhou 213003, China; guwendong1415{at}czfph.com

Abstract

The Systemic Inflammation Response Index (SIRI), based on peripheral lymphocyte, neutrophil, and monocyte counts, was recently investigated as a prognostic marker for several tumors. However, use of the SIRI has not been reported for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). We evaluated the prognostic value of the SIRI in primary and validation cohorts. We also established an effective prognostic nomogram for NPC based on clinicopathological parameters and the SIRI. The predictive accuracy and discriminative ability of the nomogram were determined using the concordance index (C-index) and a calibration curve and were compared with tumor-node-metastasis classifications. Our Kaplan-Meier survival analysis results showed that the SIRI was associated with the overall survival of patients with NPC in the primary and validation cohorts. The SIRI was identified to be an independent prognostic factor for NPC. In addition, we developed and validated a new prognostic nomogram that integrated clinicopathological factors and the SIRI. This nomogram can efficiently predict the prognosis of patients with NPC. The SIRI is a novel, simple and inexpensive prognostic predictor for patients with NPC. The SIRI has important value for predicting the prognosis of patients with NPC and developing individualized treatment plans.

  • cancer
  • prognosis
  • inflammation

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Footnotes

  • YC and WJ contributed equally.

  • Contributors YC, WJ and WG conceived and designed the study and helped to draft the manuscript. DX, JC and GX performed the data collection. WY and JJC performed the statistical analysis. All authors read and critically revised the manuscript for intellectual content and approved the final manuscript.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Not required.

  • Ethics approval The Third Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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