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Regulation of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase and its role in a porcine model of acute kidney allograft rejection
  1. Youli Wang1,
  2. Todd D Merchen2,
  3. Xuexiu Fang1,
  4. Randi Lassiter2,
  5. Chak-Sum Ho3,
  6. Ryan Jajosky4,
  7. Daniel Kleven4,
  8. Thomas Thompson4,
  9. Eslam Mohamed1,
  10. Miao Yu1,
  11. Jennifer L Waller5,
  12. N Stanley Nahman Jr1,6
  1. 1 Department of Medicine, Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia, USA
  2. 2 Department of Surgery, Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia, USA
  3. 3 Gift of Life Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
  4. 4 Department of Pathology, Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia, USA
  5. 5 Department of Population Health Sciences, Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia, USA
  6. 6 Medicine, Charlie Norwood VAMC, Augusta, Georgia, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr N Stanley Nahman Jr, Department of Medicine, Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, Augusta, GA 30912, USA; nnahman{at}augusta.edu

Abstract

In kidney transplantation acute allograft rejection is the most common cause of late allograft loss. Changes in indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) activity, which catabolizes the degradation of tryptophan to kynurenine, may predict rejection. However, exogenous IDO is immunosuppressive in rodent kidney transplantation. Thus, the increase in IDO activity observed in acute allograft rejection is insufficient to prevent rejection. To address this question, we assessed the regulation of IDO and its role in acute rejection in a porcine model of kidney transplant. In tissue samples from rejecting kidney allografts, we showed a 13-fold increase in IDO gene transcription and 20-fold increase in IDO enzyme activity when compared with autotransplanted kidneys. Allografts also demonstrated an over fourfold increase in tissue interferon (IFN)-γ, with marked increases in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, TNF-β and interleukin 1β. Gene transcription and protein levels of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) were decreased. KMO generates the immunosuppressive kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine. The results of these studies demonstrate a clear association between rejection and increased allograft IDO expression, likely driven in part by IFN-γ and facilitated by other cytokines of the allogeneic response. Moreover, the loss of downstream enzymatic activity in the IDO metabolic pathway may suggest novel mechanisms for the perpetuation of rejection.

  • kidney transplantation
  • immune tolerance

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Footnotes

  • Contributors All authors have contributed to the preparation of this manuscript.

  • Funding This work was supported in part by grants from the Carlos and Marguerite Mason Charitable Trust (TDM), and Reserve Research grant fund #S-2444 from Dialysis Clinic (NSN).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Not required.

  • Ethics approval All experiments were conducted in accordance with the National Institutes of Health Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, and approved and monitored by the Augusta University Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC).

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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