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Acute on chronic gastrointestinal bleeding: a unique clinical entity
  1. Don C Rockey1,
  2. Adam C Hafemeister2,
  3. Joan S Reisch3
  1. 1Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA (present Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Univeristy of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA)
  2. 2Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA (present Austin Gastroenterology, Austin, Texas, USA)
  3. 3Division of Biostatistics, Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and Parkland Memorial Hospital, Dallas, Texas, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Don C Rockey, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street, Suite 803, MSC 623, Charleston, SC 29425, USA; rockey{at}musc.edu

Abstract

Gastrointestinal bleeding is defined in temporal–spatial terms—as acute or chronic, and/or by its location in the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we define a distinct type of bleeding, which we have coined ‘acute on chronic’ gastrointestinal bleeding. We prospectively identified all patients who underwent endoscopic evaluation for any form of gastrointestinal bleeding at a University Hospital. Acute on chronic bleeding was defined as the presence of new symptoms or signs of acute bleeding in the setting of chronic bleeding, documented as iron deficiency anemia. Bleeding lesions were categorized using previously established criteria. We identified a total of 776, 254, and 430 patients with acute, chronic, or acute on chronic bleeding, respectively. In patients with acute on chronic gastrointestinal bleeding, lesions were most commonly identified in esophagus (28%), colon and rectum (27%), and stomach (21%) (p<0.0001 vs locations for acute or chronic bleeding). In those specifically with acute on chronic upper gastrointestinal bleeding (n=260), bleeding was most commonly due to portal hypertensive lesions, identified in 47% of subjects compared with 29% of acute and 25% of chronic bleeders, (p<0.001). In all patients with acute on chronic bleeding, 30-day mortality was less than that after acute bleeding alone (2% (10/430) vs 7% (54/776), respectively, p<0.001). Acute on chronic gastrointestinal bleeding is common, and in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding was most often a result of portal hypertensive upper gastrointestinal tract pathology. Reduced mortality in patients with acute on chronic gastrointestinal bleeding compared with those with acute bleeding raises the possibility of an adaptive response.

  • Peptic Ulcer
  • Endoscopy
  • Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage

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Footnotes

  • Contributors DCR was involved in study concept and design, acquisition of data, analysis and interpretation of data, drafting of the manuscript, critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content, statistical analysis, and oversight of the study. ACH was involved in study concept and design, acquisition of data, analysis and interpretation of data, drafting of the manuscript, critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content, and statistical analysis. JSR was involved in analysis and interpretation of data, drafting of the manuscript, critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content, and statistical analysis.

  • Funding None.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Ethics approval The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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