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ID: 10: FRAGMENTED QRS DOES NOT PREDICT ONSET OF HEART FAILURE WITH PRESERVED EJECTION FRACTION IN PATIENTS WITH DIASTOLIC DYSFUNCTION
  1. I Karagodin1,
  2. JL Strande2,
  3. B Marong3
  1. 1Internal Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States
  2. 2Cardiovascular Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States
  3. 3Medical Student, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States

Abstract

Background Depolarization and repolarization ECG abnormalities such as fragmented QRS and wide frontal QRS-T angles are associated with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and are associated with adverse outcomes. However, no studies have investigated whether these abnormalities are present in asymptomatic diastolic dysfunction and whether these abnormalities are predictive of the development of HFpEF in subjects with diastolic dysfunction. The goal of this study is to determine whether fQRS and widening of the QRS-T angle precedes the development of HFpEF in patients with diastolic dysfunction.

Methods This retrospective cohort study included 100 subjects with diastolic dysfunction and an ejection fraction >50% as reported on transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) who were free of HF at baseline. We analyzed 12-lead ECGs to determine fQRS and frontal QRS-T angle. Patients with QRS>120 ms, bundle branch block pattern, or incomplete right bundle branch block were excluded. The subjects were divided into two groups: Group 1 (n=53) included subjects who were known to progress to HFpEF and Group 2 (n=47) included patients who remained asymptomatic.

Results There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients with fQRS in Group 1 compared to Group 2 (33/41 vs. 35/42, p=0.78). The difference was also not significant when comparing hypertensive patients in Group 1 versus Group 2 (28/35 vs. 24/30, p=1.0), as well as patients without hypertension in both groups (5/6 vs. 11/12, p=1.0). On average, the QRS-T angle was wider in Group 1 (64.6) compared to Group 2 (51.7).

Conclusion In patients with asymptomatic diastolic dysfunction, fragmented QRS is present in both patients who progress to HFpEF as well as patients who remain asymptomatic. This suggests that fragmented QRS is associated with diastolic dysfunction, but does not predict the development of heart failure symptoms. The frontal QRS-T angle may be a useful measurement in predicting which patients go on to develop HFpEF. However, larger prospective studies are needed to further investigate this relationship.

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