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253 BODY MASS INDEX AS A PREDICTOR OF ASTHMA SEVERITY IN ADULT ASTHMATICS: RESULTS FROM THE FOUR-STATE NATIONAL ASTHMA SURVEY.
  1. B. A. Taylor1,
  2. C. Brown2,
  3. D. Crocker2,
  4. J. Moorman2,
  5. N. Twum-Baah1,
  6. F. Holguin1
  1. 1Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA
  2. 2Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA

Abstract

Introduction Obesity has been associated with asthma severity; however, this association has not been explored in the four-state National Asthma Survey (NAS).

Objective Demonstrate the association between obesity and asthma severity in NAS.

Methods We studied obesity and asthma severity using data from NAS, which includes 5,741 asthmatics. We analyzed data from 2,793 adult subjects (age ≥ 18) with current asthma and self-referred weight and height. Subjects were then divided into nonoverweight (BMI ≤ 25), overweight (BMI > 25 and < 30), and obese (BMI ≥ 30). Asthma severity included symptoms, health care use, asthma control, and the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) class. Multivariate analysis adjusted for the confounders gender, race, age, education, income, and employment status.

Results There were a total of 940 (34%) obese, 899 (32%) overweight, and 954 (34%) nonoverweight adult asthmatics. Obese asthmatics were more likely to have less education, be unemployed, and be African American. Compared with nonoverweight subjects, obese asthmatics were also more likely to report continuous symptoms and nocturnal symptoms, have more ER visits, and be classified as GINA IV. Multivariate analysis is shown in the Table.

Conclusions In a large sample of adult asthmatics, obesity is associated with asthma severity.

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