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141 NO-HANDS VIDEO GAMES: CONTROLLING A CURSOR WITH THOUGHT ALONE (CONSTRUCTION OF A ROBUST, MULTIDIMENSIONAL, BRAIN-COMPUTER INTERFACE USING ELECTROCORTICOGRAPHIC RECORDING IN HUMANS).
  1. K. J. Miller1,
  2. G. Schalk1,
  3. R. P.N. Rao**,
  4. E. C. Leuthardt+,
  5. J. G. Ojemann++
  1. 1Physics and School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Wadsworth Institute, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY
  2. **Computer Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
  3. +Neurosurgery, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, and Washington University, St. Louis, MO
  4. ++Neurosurgery, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

Abstract

Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) have received attention recently as a method to restore or enhance impaired function and as a method for communication where all conventional methods are impossible. We have developed methods for rapid identification of cortical control signals using thought without movement and implementation of these signals for cursor control in target tasks. Electrocorticographic (ECoG) electrodes are placed subdurally for seizure focus localization prior to resection in the context of intractable epilepsy. The participating subjects were asked to perform real and imagined movement, and we calculated the change in the cortical spectra at each electrode during this. Subjects rapidly attained up to 100% control in a cursor control experiment, and this is demonstrated in video showing the cursor task and brain activity simultaneously. We demonstrate the efficacy of this method, showing dramatically how thought alone can be translated into action.

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