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481 REASSESSING EDUCATION NORMS IN NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS: A COMPARISON OF SELF-REPORTED EDUCATION VERSUS READING GRADE LEVEL IN HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS.
  1. M. Rohit,
  2. A. Levine,
  3. E. J. Singer
  1. David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, CA; National Neurological AIDS Bank, Los Angeles, CA

Abstract

Background HIV infection commonly results in neurological and neurocognitive deficits, including HIV-associated dementia. A standardized neuropsychological (NP) test battery is often administered to determine the presence of neurocognitive impairment. NP tests rely on normative data to produce standardized scores and may adjust for a patient's stated years of education. However, the stated years of education do not necessarily correlate with the quality of education obtained. Thus, a discrepancy in the quality of schooling may result in significantly different levels of functioning. This suggests that individuals with poor-quality education may be more likely to score as cognitively impaired on the NP tests, resulting in a false-positive diagnosis of impairment.

Objective To determine if standardized NP test scores based on self-reported years of education or the Wide Range Achievement Test-3 (WRAT-3) reading test grade-equivalent level are more accurate in predicting neurocognitive impairment.

Methods 120 HIV-positive participants were administered a NP test battery as part of a comprehensive evaluation. Subjects were classified by a neurologist as either (1) unimpaired/subsyndromic or (2) neurologically impaired (possible or probable HIV-associated motor/cognitive disorder). Raw neuropsychological test scores were converted to T-scores using published norms, with education determined in two ways: (1) self-reported education or (2) WRAT-3 reading grade level. T-scores across 7 measures were averaged, and individuals with a mean T-score of less than 41 were classified as neuropsychologically impaired. Cross-tabulation tables were used to determine sensitivity and specificity of the two methods in detecting neurological impairment.

Results T-scores derived from WRAT-3 reading scores were more sensitive than those derived from self-report (77.6% vs 13.1%) in detecting neurological impairment, although specificity was somewhat lower (81.4% vs 94.9%).

Conclusions Normative data based on WRAT-3 reading scores were more accurate than those based on self-report in classifying individuals as neurologically impaired vs unimpaired. The use of reading tests for determining true education level may be a useful alternative in deriving neuropsychological test norms.

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